Bid for Pitsea flats submitted to Basildon Council

A bid for eight apartment blocks in Pitsea reaching up to eight storeys tall and containing hundreds of flats has been launched.

Basildon Borough Council validated an application by K E Kent Transport and Storage for 217 one-three bedroom flats on April 13.

The proposals would redevelop the land north of Terminus Drive, a nearly-two Hectare disused brownfield site next to Pitsea Railway Station.

According to a design and access statement submitted alongside the proposals, the site is also bordered by a waste management site and the A13.

A section reads: “The aspiration of the proposal is to redevelop this 1.94ha brownfield site with an outstanding proposal of a new residential quarter with 217 new apartments providing high quality living experience both through the design of the apartments and the external environment. Environmental consideration and sustainability to be at the forefront of the design.”

According to the statement, the five tallest blocks, three reaching eight storeys and two reaching five storeys, are planned to be built along the edge of the A13. Three smaller blocks of four-five storeys would be built nearer the station.

This is to reduce the visual impact on background views from Cromwell Manor, a nearby Grade II listed building, the statement continues.

All of the flats would meet or exceed national space standards. Out of the proposed 217 apartments, 68 are proposed as affordable and 149 as private sale.

A 6m noise barrier is being proposed along the southern border near the waste management site, along with planting to soften its visual appearance. Similarly, an access road with car parking spaces will be used to create an 18m buffer between the flats and the A13 flyover.

All of the buildings would be oriented to east and west with no windows facing south or north. According to the statement, this is to ensure good quality views in both directions and to enable cross ventilation.

This is a single application is for full planning permission, rather than being split into an outline and reserved matters stages.

Charlie Ridler

Local Democracy Reporter