Knife crime film seen by more than 25,000

More than 25,000 people have watched a documentary about the impact knife crime and youth violence has had on families in east London.

Barking and Dagenham Council produced the short film, directed by Nathan Miller, as part of its “Lost Hours” campaign.

It features people who have been impacted by youth violence, including Peter Chesney whose daughter Jodie, 17, was stabbed to death in Harold Hill in March 2019 and Beatrice Mushiya whose son Duran Kajiama, 17, was killed as he and a friend walked to a birthday party in November 2016.

It was recorded in the borough and includes landmarks such as Barking Station, Dagenham Heathway and the Gascoigne estate.

The campaign has also seen adverts placed on buses and at stations and asks parents to keep tabs on their children, particularly between the hours of 3pm and 7pm when statics show there are spikes of violence amongst teenagers.

In the past two years Barking and Dagenham has seen 67 reported knife attacks where a young person was injured and 1,794 robberies by a young person.

Councillor Maureen Worby, cabinet member for social care and health integration said: “I’m delighted to see how well the film has gone down with local people and that residents are really supporting our hard-hitting approach to this issue.

“Unfortunately, youth violence is happening on our doorsteps and we need parents to start realising that their children could be involved. So, we’re asking you to start questioning your children, before they do something they may later regret.”

To see the film visit: www.losthours.org.

It features people who have been impacted by youth violence, including Peter Chesney whose daughter Jodie, 17, was stabbed to death in Harold Hill in March 2019 and Beatrice Mushiya whose son Duran Kajiama, 17, was killed as he and a friend walked to a birthday party in November 2016.

It was recorded in the borough and includes landmarks such as Barking Station, Dagenham Heathway and the Gascoigne estate.

The campaign has also seen adverts placed on buses and at stations and asks parents to keep tabs on their children, particularly between the hours of 3pm and 7pm when statics show there are spikes of violence amongst teenagers.

In the past two years Barking and Dagenham has seen 67 reported knife attacks where a young person was injured and 1,794 robberies by a young person.

Councillor Maureen Worby, cabinet member for social care and health integration said: “I’m delighted to see how well the film has gone down with local people and that residents are really supporting our hard-hitting approach to this issue.

“Unfortunately, youth violence is happening on our doorsteps and we need parents to start realising that their children could be involved. So, we’re asking you to start questioning your children, before they do something they may later regret.”

To see the film visit: www.losthours.org.

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Rachael Burford

Local Democracy Reporter